Perfect Invincibility

AS A CHILD, I came home from Cub Scouts with a block of wood. I told my dad we had to make a racecar and compete with other Cub Scouts. He asked me, “What do you want to make? A Ferrari or a Lamborghini?” I responded, “That Italian trash, hell no.” I told him my favourite car was the Porsche 930 Turbo. Its unparalleled lines and flared rear fenders have an aggressive stance. The perfectly molded rear fin, ready to take flight.

Hours turned into days and we carved out a 911, whale tail and all. Unfortunately, not with enough wood to flare out the rear fenders. Back then, I thought this Cub car looked incredible. Now when I look at it, it looks more like a ’72 911 RS. Not a bad trade-off either. It was still the most iconic transformation of wood at the Cub Scout race. I became an overnight celebrity at our weekly Cub Scout meeting because every other car looked like a block of wood with wheels.

“What do you want to make? A Ferrari or a Lamborghini?” I responded, “That Italian trash, hell no.” I told him my favourite car was the Porsche 930 Turbo.

Dreams turned to reality last September when I purchased my first Porsche 911 Turbo S (991 generation). Fully loaded, black on black, from Pfaff Porsche. The staff were amazing, and the car is even better.

My garage has now been converted into a stable, nurturing almost 600 horses. Getting in this car for the first time was like sitting in a cockpit. Turn the key and I’m pulverized with an abundance of testosterone. No need for a radio, the radio is underneath the hood. Putting my foot on the accelerator, it instantly transforms the car into a weapon. I felt like I became an engineer, rewriting the laws of physics with every hairpin turn. So aggressive, yet completely in command and control with the unthinkable four-wheel drive. The amount of adrenaline rushing through my veins is unmeasurable.  I’m not sure they make a pair of sunglasses cool enough to wear in this rocket launcher. Maybe headgear from NASA will suffice.

She is simply stunning and puts a smile on my face every day. Even when she is covered in the garage the lines are aggressive and perfect. Taking her out for a joyride, I never miss an amber light, just concerned if an officer is waiting on the other side of the road for me. The highway transforms and becomes an effortless pleasure. Monstrously fast, in an instant, all cars around me feel like they are going against the traffic. The only way I can get closer to the road is by licking the asphalt with my tongue.

No need for a radio, the radio is underneath the hood. Putting my foot on the accelerator, it instantly transforms the car into a weapon. I felt like I became an engineer, rewriting the laws of physics with every hairpin turn.

She obviously has centre locks, so I bought a set of black OZ 20-inch racing rims and purchased stock 305/35 20-inch Michelin winter tires, to keep her perfect silhouette. She was like a refined adrenaline junkie in the snow without losing an ounce of the signature Porsche handling. It’s contagious. I can’t help but have the same excitement for all Porsche owners every time I see a Porsche on the road. We all have the same love and passion.

As an architect, design and performance for me is everything. I feel that the 992 is starting to change the Porsche signature look from the rear, just a little too futuristic and modern for me. Someone said it best, the 991 still captures the frog stance in the rear as the 992 looks more like a bee with a higher hip.  At first rear glance, I thought that the back of the 992 looks more like the next-generation Audi TT, if they are still going to make them. Honestly, the 992 is still a beautiful car.

My father and I have always had a love for Germany technology. He has always driven Mercedes-Benz and he has always asked me why I have never bought a Mercedes-Benz? I keep telling him I’m not old enough to drive a Mercedes-Benz. But you can never outgrow the feeling of a Porsche in a lifetime. </>

Story and Photos by Salvatore Arrichiello, PCA UCR Member | Porschephile Editor: Jillian Weir

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